About the Wheatsheaf Sweater

I cast on for a Wheatsheaf Sweater to go with the Wheatsheaf Poncho. It’s a V neck sweater and I’m knitting the Aline version, not least to match my own shape as I’m bottom heavy or pear shaped. I am using Stylecraft Special Aran with Wool in the Oatmeal colourway. I’ll be writing the pattern to work in the round (bottom up) and also a seamed version. I have talked before about how seams add strength and structure to a garment, they also stop it moving around the body when worn.

I also had to consider the cable pattern and what impact that would have on the fabric of the sweater. Because the cable pattern uses more stitches per 4 inches/10cm, I had to add extra stitches to maintain the correct width of each piece of the sweater. That was easy for the sleeves and back of the sweater as they only have one central cable panel. However, on the front which has two cable panels, it required thought to centre the cables, add some stitches between them to make a seam stitch either side of the V neck.

Shoulders and Fit

I do like the trend for drop shoulder sweaters, but with slimmer shoulders and a larger lower body, it’s not a good look for my body shape. I decided to go with the Modified Drop Shoulder, I’ll add a diagram below this section so you can see what that means.

Drop Shoulders typically have the seam part way down the arm, which can be unflattering for those with slim or narrow shoulders as the jumper looks like it’s falling off the body and you end up with a large amount of fabric under the arms.

A modified drop shoulder, in this case, has the seam moved in to sit on my shoulder line, the sleeves are extended to match the difference between the underarm position and the new shoulder/armhole line. The solid line at the top of the sleeve shows the extra length added to the sleeve to ‘fill’ the armhole area but keep the shoulder seam where I want it to be.

Wheatsheaf Sweater body showing modified drop shoulder line, v neck and aline body shaping
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Wheatsheaf Sweater body showing modified drop shoulder line, v neck and aline body shaping
Wheatsheaf Sweater sleeve schematick, you'll see the sleeve is longer, the portion above the solid line at the top of the sleeve is the extension which fills the armhole gap.
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Wheatsheaf Sweater sleeve schematick, you’ll see the sleeve is longer, the portion above the solid line at the top of the sleeve is the extension which fills the armhole gap.

Wheatsheaf Sweater Sleeves

The photo below shows both sleeves, on in progress, the other completed and blocked, they are worked flat for my prototype garment, but the pattern will be written to include instructions for working in the round too!

Wheatsheaf Sweater Sleeves, worked flat
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Sleeve two showing cable detail and a 400g ball of the Stylecraft Special Aran with wool in the oatmeal colourway
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Sleeve two showing the first repeat of the cable pattern in the centre of the sleeve. The sleeve is shown with a 400g ball of the Stylecraft Special Aran with wool in the oatmeal colourway

I’ll be starting the test knit for the sweater pattern on the 20th February, if you’re interested, do sign up in the test volunteer thread to receive an earburn/message when the test starts, here. Or, sign up for our newsletter here.

Suitable yarns for the Wheatsheaf Sweater

You need an Aran weight or heavy worsted weight yarn. Cascade 220, Berroco Vintage or Vanna’s Choice would be suitable or any Aran weight yarn. I used Stylecraft Special Aran with Wool because it’s affordable and machine washable.

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